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Up in Arms: Immune and Nervous System Response to Sea Star Wasting Disease

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
Up in Arms: Immune and Nervous System Response to Sea Star Wasting Disease
Published in
PLoS ONE, July 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0133053
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren E. Fuess, Morgan E. Eisenlord, Collin J. Closek, Allison M. Tracy, Ruth Mauntz, Sarah Gignoux-Wolfsohn, Monica M. Moritsch, Reyn Yoshioka, Colleen A. Burge, C. Drew Harvell, Carolyn S. Friedman, Ian Hewson, Paul K. Hershberger, Steven B. Roberts

Abstract

Echinoderms, positioned taxonomically at the base of deuterostomes, provide an important system for the study of the evolution of the immune system. However, there is little known about the cellular components and genes associated with echinoderm immunity. The 2013-2014 sea star wasting disease outbreak is an emergent, rapidly spreading disease, which has led to large population declines of asteroids in the North American Pacific. While evidence suggests that the signs of this disease, twisting arms and lesions, may be attributed to a viral infection, the host response to infection is still poorly understood. In order to examine transcriptional responses of the sea star Pycnopodia helianthoides to sea star wasting disease, we injected a viral sized fraction (0.2 μm) homogenate prepared from symptomatic P. helianthoides into apparently healthy stars. Nine days following injection, when all stars were displaying signs of the disease, specimens were sacrificed and coelomocytes were extracted for RNA-seq analyses. A number of immune genes, including those involved in Toll signaling pathways, complement cascade, melanization response, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were differentially expressed. Furthermore, genes involved in nervous system processes and tissue remodeling were also differentially expressed, pointing to transcriptional changes underlying the signs of sea star wasting disease. The genomic resources presented here not only increase understanding of host response to sea star wasting disease, but also provide greater insight into the mechanisms underlying immune function in echinoderms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 24%
Student > Master 15 18%
Researcher 6 7%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 55%
Environmental Science 13 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 7%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 5 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2017.
All research outputs
#151,565
of 12,735,000 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#3,142
of 138,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,295
of 230,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#123
of 6,391 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,735,000 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,340 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,391 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.