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Subglacial discharge at tidewater glaciers revealed by seismic tremor

Overview of attention for article published in Geophysical Research Letters, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Subglacial discharge at tidewater glaciers revealed by seismic tremor
Published in
Geophysical Research Letters, August 2015
DOI 10.1002/2015gl064590
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy C. Bartholomaus, Jason M. Amundson, Jacob I. Walter, Shad O'Neel, Michael E. West, Christopher F. Larsen

Abstract

Subglacial discharge influences glacier basal motion and erodes and redeposits sediment. At tidewater glacier termini, discharge drives submarine terminus melting, affects fjord circulation, and is a central component of proglacial marine ecosystems. However, our present inability to track subglacial discharge and its variability significantly hinders our understanding of these processes. Here we report observations of hourly to seasonal variations in 1.5-10 Hz seismic tremor that strongly correlate with subglacial discharge but not with basal motion, weather, or discrete icequakes. Our data demonstrate that vigorous discharge occurs from tidewater glaciers during summer, in spite of fast basal motion that could limit the formation of subglacial conduits, and then abates during winter. Furthermore, tremor observations and a melt model demonstrate that drainage efficiency of tidewater glaciers evolves seasonally. Glaciohydraulic tremor provides a means by which to quantify subglacial discharge variations and offers a promising window into otherwise obscured glacierized environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 6%
Chile 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 62 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 37%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 8 12%
Professor 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 51 75%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2019.
All research outputs
#477,933
of 14,794,860 outputs
Outputs from Geophysical Research Letters
#1,152
of 14,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,087
of 230,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Geophysical Research Letters
#29
of 322 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,794,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,248 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 322 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.