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Autophagy Impairment in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, January 2011
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Title
Autophagy Impairment in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain
Published in
Molecular Pain, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-7-83
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Berliocchi, Rossella Russo, Maria Maiarù, Alessandra Levato, Giacinto Bagetta, Maria Tiziana Corasaniti

Abstract

Autophagy is an intracellular membrane trafficking pathway controlling the delivery of cytoplasmic material to the lysosomes for degradation. It plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both normal settings and abnormal, stressful conditions. It is now recognised that an imbalance in the autophagic process can impact basal cell functions and this has recently been implicated in several human diseases, including neurodegeneration and cancer.Here, we investigated the consequences of nerve injury on the autophagic process in a commonly used model of neuropathic pain. The expression and modulation of the main autophagic marker, the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), was evaluated in the L4-L5 cord segment seven days after spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Levels of LC3-II, the autophagosome-associated LC3 form, were markedly higher in the spinal cord ipsilateral to the ligation side, appeared to correlate with the upregulation of the calcium channel subunit α2δ-1 and were not present in mice that underwent sham surgery. However, LC3-I and Beclin 1 expression were only slightly increased. On the contrary, SNL promoted the accumulation of the ubiquitin- and LC3-binding protein p62, which inversely correlates with autophagic activity, thus pointing to a block of autophagosome turnover.Our data showed for the first time that basal autophagy is disrupted in a model of neuropathic pain.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 9 26%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 8 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2011.
All research outputs
#11,167,454
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#403
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,592
of 105,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#9
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.