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High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 1,384)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
245 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
100 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
309 Mendeley
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Title
High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0254-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stuart J.H. Biddle, Alan M. Batterham

Abstract

The efficacy of high-intensity interval training for a broad spectrum of cardio-metabolic health outcomes is not in question. Rather, the effectiveness of this form of exercise is at stake. In this paper we debate the issues concerning the likely success or failure of high-intensity interval training interventions for population-level health promotion. Biddle maintains that high-intensity interval training cannot be a viable public health strategy as it will not be adopted or maintained by many people. This conclusion is based on an analysis of perceptions of competence, the psychologically aversive nature of high-intensity exercise, the affective component of attitudes, the less conscious elements of motivated behaviour that reflect our likes and dislikes, and analysis using the RE-AIM framework. Batterham argues that this appraisal is based on a constrained and outmoded definition of high-intensity interval training and that truly practical and scalable protocols have been - and continue to be - developed. He contends that the purported displeasure associated with this type of exercise has been overstated. Biddle suggests that the way forward is to help the least active become more active rather than the already active to do more. Batterham claims that traditional physical activity promotion has been a spectacular failure. He proposes that, within an evolutionary health promotion framework, high-intensity interval training could be a successful population strategy for producing rapid physiological adaptations benefiting public health, independent of changes in total physical activity energy expenditure. Biddle recommends that we focus our attention elsewhere if we want population-level gains in physical activity impacting public health. His conclusion is based on his belief that high-intensity interval training interventions will have limited reach, effectiveness, and adoption, and poor implementation and maintenance. In contrast, Batterham maintains that there is genuine potential for scalable, enjoyable high-intensity interval exercise interventions to contribute substantially to addressing areas of public health priority, including prevention and treatment of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 245 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 309 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 301 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 69 22%
Student > Master 58 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 14%
Unspecified 28 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 7%
Other 89 29%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 121 39%
Unspecified 48 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 12%
Psychology 30 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 9%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 194. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2019.
All research outputs
#71,099
of 13,728,145 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#17
of 1,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,123
of 185,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,728,145 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 185,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them