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Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes: a natural experiment study

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 350)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes: a natural experiment study
Published in
Population Health Metrics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12963-015-0050-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheng Huang, Catherine Nichols, Yang Liu, Yunping Zhang, Xiaohong Liu, Suhong Gao, Zhiwen Li, Aiguo Ren

Abstract

Radical regulations to improve air quality, including traffic control, were implemented prior to and during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. Consequently, ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particular matter 10 micrometers or less (PM10), were reduced in a distinct and short window of time, which presented a natural experiment for testing the relationships between maternal exposure to PM10 and NO2 during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes. We estimated the effect of PM10 and NO2 exposure during each trimester of gestation on the risk of preterm birth among live births and the birth weight among term babies. The data were based on 50,874 live births delivered between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010 at the Beijing Haidian Maternal and Child Health Hospital. Air monitoring data for the same period were obtained from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center. Among full-term births, maternal exposure to NO2 in the third trimester predicted birth weight, with each 10-unit increment (per 10 ug/m(3)) in NO2 concentration associated with a 13.78 g (95 % confidence interval: -21.12, -6.43; p < 0.0001) reduction in birth weight. This association was maintained after adjusting for other pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and PM10. No relationship was found between the concentration of PM10 and low birth weight among full-term births. Neither PM10 nor NO2 concentrations predicted the risk of premature birth. Exposure to ambient air pollution during certain periods of pregnancy may decrease birth weight, but the effect size is small.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Researcher 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 15 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 26%
Environmental Science 16 18%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 19 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2020.
All research outputs
#1,781,186
of 16,651,463 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#49
of 350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,718
of 236,133 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,651,463 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,133 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them