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Women’s lives in times of Zika: mosquito-controlled lives?

Overview of attention for article published in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, May 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Women’s lives in times of Zika: mosquito-controlled lives?
Published in
Cadernos de Saúde Pública, May 2018
DOI 10.1590/0102-311x00178917
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana Rosa Linde, Carlos Eduardo Siqueira

Abstract

Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of congenital brain abnormalities. Its consequences to pregnancies has made governments, national and international agencies issue advices and recommendations to women. There is a clear need to investigate how the Zika outbreak affects the decisions that women take concerning their lives and the life of their families, as well as how women are psychologically and emotionally dealing with the outbreak. We conducted a qualitative study to address the impact of the Zika epidemic on the family life of women living in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the US, who were affected by it to shed light on the social repercussions of Zika. Women were recruited through the snowball sampling technique and data was collected through semi-structured interviews. We describe the effects in mental health and the coping strategies that women use to deal with the Zika epidemic. Zika is taking a heavy toll on women's emotional well-being. They are coping with feelings of fear, helplessness, and uncertainty by taking drastic precautions to avoid infection that affect all areas of their lives. Coping strategies pose obstacles in professional life, lead to social isolation, including from family and partner, and threaten the emotional and physical well-being of women. Our findings suggest that the impacts of the Zika epidemic on women may be universal and global. Zika infection is a silent and heavy burden on women's shoulders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 22%
Student > Bachelor 14 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Psychology 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 21 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2019.
All research outputs
#8,871,584
of 14,155,626 outputs
Outputs from Cadernos de Saúde Pública
#82
of 183 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,012
of 277,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cadernos de Saúde Pública
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,626 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 183 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,148 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.