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Perspectives of continuous renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit: a paired survey study of patient, physician, and nurse views

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nephrology, July 2015
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1 tweeter

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Title
Perspectives of continuous renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit: a paired survey study of patient, physician, and nurse views
Published in
BMC Nephrology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12882-015-0086-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew S. Allegretti, Gregory Hundemer, Rajeev Chorghade, Katherine Cosgrove, Ednan Bajwa, Ishir Bhan

Abstract

Recent studies suggest discrepancies between patients and providers around perceptions of hemodialysis prognosis. Such data are lacking for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We aim to assess patient and provider understanding of outcomes around CRRT. From February 1 to August 31, 2013, a triad of (1) a patient on CRRT (or health care proxy [HCP]), (2) physician and (3) primary nurse from the intensive care unit (ICU) team were surveyed. Univariate chi-square and qualitative analysis techniques were used. Ninety-six total participants (32 survey triads) were completed. Ninety one percent of patients/HCPs correctly identified that CRRT replaced the function of the kidneys. Six percent of patients/HCPs, 44 % of physicians, and 44 % of nurses identified rates of survival to hospital discharge that were consistent with published literature. Both physicians and nurses were more likely than patients/HCPs to assess survival consistently with published data (p = 0.001). Patients/HCPs were more likely to overestimate survival rates than physicians and nurses (p < 0.001). Thirty eight percent of patients/HCPs, 38 % of physicians, and 28 % of nurses identified rates of lifelong dialysis-dependence among surviving patients that were consistent with published literature. There is mismatch between patients, HCPs, and providers around prognosis of CRRT. Patients/HCPs are more likely to overestimate chances of survival than physicians or nurses. Further intervention is needed to improve this knowledge gap.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,906,387
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nephrology
#886
of 1,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,688
of 237,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nephrology
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,235 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.