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Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond
Published in
Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease, July 2015
DOI 10.1097/nmd.0000000000000333
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elran-Barak, Roni, Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E, Benyamini, Yael, Crow, Scott J, Peterson, Carol B, Hill, Laura L, Crosby, Ross D, Mitchell, James E, Le Grange, Daniel

Abstract

We examined eating disorders in midlife and beyond by comparing frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals and younger controls. We also compared demographic and eating disorder-related characteristics across diagnoses and age groups. Participants included 2,118 treatment-seeking adults who self-reported their eating-related symptoms on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that percent of patients with BN was significantly lower whereas percent of patients with BED and OSFED was significantly higher among midlife relative to younger patients. Percent of patients with AN did not differ between midlife and younger patients. Additionally, midlife and younger patients with BED and OSFED differed on several demographic (e.g., marital status) and eating disorder-related characteristics (e.g., BMI, compulsive exercising). This study suggests that BN is less common whereas BED and OSFED are more common among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals relative to younger controls. In addition, AN and BN present fairly similarly whereas BED and OSFED present fairly differently among midlife patients relative to younger controls. Attention to these differences and similarities is necessary to understand eating disorders in midlife.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 14%
Unknown 12 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 36%
Professor 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Psychology 3 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 14%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,022,893
of 8,082,727 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease
#160
of 2,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,249
of 229,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease
#5
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,082,727 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,057 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,756 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.