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Effects of climate and plant phenology on recruitment of moose at the southern extent of their range

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of climate and plant phenology on recruitment of moose at the southern extent of their range
Published in
Oecologia, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00442-015-3296-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin L. Monteith, Robert W. Klaver, Kent R. Hersey, A. Andrew Holland, Timothy P. Thomas, Matthew J. Kauffman

Abstract

Climate plays a fundamental role in limiting the range of a species, is a key factor in the dynamics of large herbivores, and is thought to be involved in declines of moose populations in recent decades. We examined effects of climate and growing-season phenology on recruitment (8-9 months old) of young Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) over three decades, from 18 herds, across a large geographic area encompassing much of the southern extent of their range. Recruitment declined in 8 of 18 herds during 1980-2009, whereas others did not exhibit a temporal trend (none showed a positive trend). During those three decades, seasonal temperatures increased, spring-summer precipitation decreased, and spring occurred earlier, became shorter in duration, and green-up occurred faster. Recruitment was influenced negatively by warm temperatures during the year before young were born, but only for herds with declining recruitment. Dry spring-summers of the previous year and rapid rates of spring green-up in the year of birth had similar negative influences across declining and stable herds. Those patterns indicate both direct (year t ) and delayed (year t-1) effects of weather and plant phenology on recruitment of young, which we hypothesize was mediated through effects on maternal nutritional condition. Suppressed nutrition could have been induced by (1) increased thermoregulatory costs associated with warming temperatures and (2) shortened duration of availability of high-quality forage in spring. Progressive reductions in net energetic gain for species that are sensitive to climate may continue to hamper individual fitness and population dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 131 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 18%
Researcher 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 5%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 31 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 45%
Environmental Science 19 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 38 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,508,816
of 18,812,015 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#534
of 4,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,921
of 243,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#10
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.