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Urine IP-10 as a biomarker of therapeutic response in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
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Title
Urine IP-10 as a biomarker of therapeutic response in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3144-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Song Yee Kim, Jungho Kim, Deok Ryun Kim, Young Ae Kang, Sungyoung Bong, Jonghee Lee, Suyeon Kim, Nam Suk Lee, Bora Sim, Sang-Nae Cho, Young Sam Kim, Hyejon Lee

Abstract

Prior to clinical trials of new TB drugs or therapeutic vaccines, it is necessary to develop monitoring tools to predict treatment outcomes in TB patients. Urine interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a potential biomarker of treatment response in chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lung diseases, including tuberculosis. In this study, we assessed IP-10 levels in urine samples from patients with active TB at diagnosis, during treatment, and at completion, and compared these with levels in serum samples collected in parallel from matched patients to determine whether urine IP-10 can be used to monitor treatment response in patients with active TB. IP-10 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in urine and serum samples collected concomitantly from 23 patients with active TB and 21 healthy adults (44 total individuals). The Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test were used for comparisons among healthy controls and patients at three time points, and LOESS regression was used for longitudinal data. The levels of IP-10 in urine increased significantly after 2 months of treatment (P = 0.0163), but decreased by the completion of treatment (P = 0.0035). Serum IP-10 levels exhibited a similar trend, but did not increase significantly after 2 months of treatment in patients with active TB. Unstimulated IP-10 in urine can be used as a biomarker to monitor treatment response in patients with active pulmonary TB.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 29%
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Other 4 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,395,590
of 13,034,624 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,449
of 4,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,494
of 271,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
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