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Transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A focus on network mechanisms and state dependence

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

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12 tweeters

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18 Mendeley
Title
Transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A focus on network mechanisms and state dependence
Published in
NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.05.029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luca Cocchi, Andrew Zalesky, Zoie Nott, Geneviève Whybird, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Michael Breakspear

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that has shown promise as an adjunct treatment for the symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Establishing a clear clinical role for TMS in the treatment of OCD is contingent upon evidence of significant efficacy and reliability in reducing symptoms. We present the basic principles supporting the effects of TMS on brain activity with a focus on network-based theories of brain function. We discuss the promises and pitfalls of this technique as a means of modulating brain activity and reducing OCD symptoms. Synthesis of trends and critical perspective on the potential benefits and limitations of TMS interventions in OCD. Our critical synthesis suggests the need to better quantify the role of TMS in a clinical setting. The context in which the stimulation is performed, the neural principles supporting the effects of local stimulation on brain networks, and the heterogeneity of neuroanatomy are often overlooked in the clinical application of TMS. The lack of consideration of these factors may partly explain the variable efficacy of TMS interventions for OCD symptoms. Results from existing clinical studies and emerging knowledge about the effects of TMS on brain networks are encouraging but also highlight the need for further research into the use of TMS as a means of selectively normalising OCD brain network dynamics and reducing related symptoms. The combination of neuroimaging, computational modelling, and behavioural protocols known to engage brain networks affected by OCD has the potential to improve the precision and therapeutic efficacy of TMS interventions. The efficacy of this multimodal approach remains, however, to be established and its effective translation in clinical contexts presents technical and implementation challenges. Addressing these practical, scientific and technical issues is required to assess whether OCD can take its place alongside major depressive disorder as an indication for the use of TMS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 28%
Student > Master 4 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 22%
Neuroscience 4 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Unspecified 2 11%
Engineering 2 11%
Other 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,611,114
of 12,361,048 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage: Clinical
#350
of 1,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,652
of 271,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage: Clinical
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,361,048 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,213 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them