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Multiple micronutrient powders for home (point-of-use) fortification of foods in pregnant women

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple micronutrient powders for home (point-of-use) fortification of foods in pregnant women
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd011158.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Parminder S Suchdev, Juan Pablo Peña-Rosas, Luz Maria De-Regil

Abstract

It is estimated that 32 million pregnant women suffer from anaemia worldwide. Due to increased metabolic demands, pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to anaemia and vitamin and mineral deficiencies, leading to adverse health effects in both the mother and her baby. Despite the demonstrated benefits of prenatal supplementation with iron and folic acid or multiple micronutrients, poor adherence to routine supplementation has limited the effectiveness of this intervention in many settings. Micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification are packed, single-dose sachets containing vitamins and minerals that can be added onto prepared food to improve its nutrient profile. The use of multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods in pregnant women could be an alternative intervention to prenatal micronutrient supplementation. To assess the effects of prenatal home (point-of-use) fortification of foods with multiple micronutrient powders on maternal and newborn health. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2015) and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 January 2015). We also contacted relevant agencies to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials (both individual and cluster randomisation) and quasi-randomised trials, irrespective of language or publication status.The intervention was micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods, containing at least three micronutrients with one of them being iron, provided to pregnant women of any gestational age and parity. Five comparison groups were considered: no intervention/placebo, iron and folic acid supplements, iron-only supplements, folic-acid only supplements, and multiple micronutrients in supplements. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies, extracted and checked data accuracy, and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Our search identified 12 reports (relating to six studies). We included two cluster-randomised controlled trials (involving 1172 women) - these trials were considered to be at a moderate to high risk of bias due to methodological limitations. One trial is ongoing, and three studies were excluded. Micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods versus iron and folic acid supplementsOne trial (involving 478 pregnant women attending 42 antenatal care centres) compared micronutrient powders containing iron, folic acid, vitamin C and zinc with iron and folic acid tablets provided daily from 14 to 22 weeks to 32 weeks' gestation. The trial did not report on any of this review's primary outcomes: maternal anaemia at or near term, maternal iron deficiency, maternal mortality, adverse effects, low birthweight, preterm births. Nor did the trial report on the majority of this review's secondary outcomes, with the exception of maternal adherence. Adherence to micronutrient powders was lower than adherence to iron and folic acid supplements (risk ratio (RR) 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 0.87, one study, n = 405). Micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods versus same multiple micronutrients in supplementsOne study (involving 694 pregnant women from 18 communities), compared micronutrient powders containing iron, folic acid, vitamin C, zinc, iodine, vitamin E and vitamin B12 with tablets containing the same seven micronutrients. There was no difference in maternal anaemia at 37 weeks of gestation (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.59, one study, n = 470, very low quality evidence). The trial did not report on any of this review's other primary outcomes in relation to maternal iron deficiency, maternal mortality, adverse effects, low birthweight, or preterm birth. In terms of this review's secondary outcomes, the included trial did not report on the majority of this review's prespecified secondary outcomes with one exception - there was no clear difference in maternal haemoglobin Hb or near term (mean difference (MD) 1.0 g/L, 95% CI -1.77 to 3.77, one study, n = 470). Limited evidence suggests that micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods have no clear difference as multiple micronutrient supplements on maternal anaemia (very low quality evidence) and Hb at or near term. There is limited evidence to suggest that women were more likely to adhere to taking tablets than using micronutrient powders.The overall quality of evidence was judged very low (due to methodological limitations), and no evidence was available for the majority of primary and secondary outcomes. Therefore, more evidence is needed to assess the potential benefits or harms of the use of micronutrient powders in pregnant women on maternal and infant health outcomes. Future trials should also assess adherence to micronutrient powders and be adequately powered to evaluate the effects on birth outcomes and morbidity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 12%
Australia 1 6%
Switzerland 1 6%
United Kingdom 1 6%
Spain 1 6%
United States 1 6%
Unknown 10 59%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 63 371%
Researcher 38 224%
Student > Bachelor 29 171%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 159%
Unspecified 22 129%
Other 55 324%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 82 482%
Nursing and Health Professions 41 241%
Unspecified 36 212%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 118%
Social Sciences 20 118%
Other 35 206%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,317,430
of 13,396,110 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,081
of 10,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,597
of 235,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#141
of 256 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,396,110 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,585 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,194 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 256 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.