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The need for multisectoral food chain approaches to reduce trans fat consumption in India

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
The need for multisectoral food chain approaches to reduce trans fat consumption in India
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1988-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shauna M Downs, Archna Singh, Vidhu Gupta, Karen Lock, Suparna Ghosh-Jerath

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends virtually eliminating trans fat from the global food supply. Although several high-income countries have successfully reduced trans fat levels in foods, low- and middle-income countries such as India face additional challenges to its removal from the food supply. This study provides a systems analysis of the Indian food chain to assess intervention options for reducing trans fat intake in low-income consumers. Data were collected at the manufacturer, retailer and consumer levels. Qualitative interviews were conducted with vanaspati manufacturers (n = 13) and local food vendors (n = 44). Laboratory analyses (n = 39) of street foods/snacks sold by the vendors were also conducted. Trans fat and snack intakes were also examined in low-income consumers in two rural villages (n = 260) and an urban slum (n = 261). Manufacturers of vanaspati described reducing trans fat levels as feasible but identified challenges in using healthier oils. The fat content of sampled oils from street vendors contained high levels of saturated fat (24.7-69.3 % of total fat) and trans fat (0.1-29.9 % of total fat). Households were consuming snacks high in trans fat as part of daily diets (31 % village and 84.3 % of slum households) and 4 % of rural and 13 % of urban households exceeded WHO recommendations for trans fat intakes. A multisectoral food chain approach to reducing trans fat is needed in India and likely in other low- and middle-income countries worldwide. This will require investment in development of competitively priced bakery shortenings and economic incentives for manufacturing foods using healthier oils. Increased production of healthier oils will also be required alongside these investments, which will become increasingly important as more and more countries begin investing in palm oil production.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 12 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Social Sciences 9 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2019.
All research outputs
#892,587
of 15,124,076 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#970
of 10,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,470
of 235,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,124,076 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them