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Historical Transition of Sexuality Education in Japan and Outline of Reproductive Health/Rights

Overview of attention for article published in Nihon eiseigaku zasshi Japanese journal of hygiene, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 152)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Readers on

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5 Mendeley
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Title
Historical Transition of Sexuality Education in Japan and Outline of Reproductive Health/Rights
Published in
Nihon eiseigaku zasshi Japanese journal of hygiene, January 2018
DOI 10.1265/jjh.73.178
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emiko NISHIOKA

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the historical transition of sexuality education in Japan and the direction of sexuality education taken by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). Reproductive health/rights, a key concept in sex education, is also discussed. In Japanese society, discussion on sexuality has long been considered taboo. After the Second World War, sexuality education in Japan began as "purity education." From 1960 until the early 1970s, physical aspects such as genital organs, function, secondary sexual characteristics, and gender differences were emphasized. Comprehensive education as a human being, including physiological, psychological, and social aspects, began to be adopted in the late 1970s. In 2002, it was criticized that teaching genital terms at primary schools and teaching about sexual intercourse and contraceptive methods at junior high schools were "overdue guidance" and "extreme contents." Sexuality education in schools has become a problem and has stagnated for about 10 years. Currently, schools teach sexuality education that does not deviate from the MEXT course guidelines. The direction of MEXT regarding sexuality education should be examined from the basic position that sexual activity by children is inappropriate. Reproductive health/rights apply the concept of human rights to sexuality and reproduction. Reproductive health/rights are key concepts that support sex education and women's health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 40%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 60%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%
Engineering 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,127,235
of 12,516,792 outputs
Outputs from Nihon eiseigaku zasshi Japanese journal of hygiene
#13
of 152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,738
of 272,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nihon eiseigaku zasshi Japanese journal of hygiene
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,516,792 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them