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The role of dyking and fault control in the rapid onset of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, October 2011
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Title
The role of dyking and fault control in the rapid onset of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile
Published in
Nature, October 2011
DOI 10.1038/nature10541
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charles Wicks, Juan Carlos de la Llera, Luis E. Lara, Jacob Lowenstern

Abstract

Rhyolite is the most viscous of liquid magmas, so it was surprising that on 2 May 2008 at Chaitén Volcano, located in Chile's southern Andean volcanic zone, rhyolitic magma migrated from more than 5 km depth in less than 4 hours (ref. 1) and erupted explosively with only two days of detected precursory seismic activity. The last major rhyolite eruption before that at Chaitén was the largest volcanic eruption in the twentieth century, at Novarupta volcano, Alaska, in 1912. Because of the historically rare and explosive nature of rhyolite eruptions and because of the surprisingly short warning before the eruption of the Chaitén volcano, any information about the workings of the magmatic system at Chaitén, and rhyolitic systems in general, is important from both the scientific and hazard perspectives. Here we present surface deformation data related to the Chaitén eruption based on radar interferometry observations from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DAICHI (ALOS) satellite. The data on this explosive rhyolite eruption indicate that the rapid ascent of rhyolite occurred through dyking and that melt segregation and magma storage were controlled by existing faults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 111 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 33%
Researcher 33 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Student > Master 7 6%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 8 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 98 81%
Engineering 4 3%
Environmental Science 1 <1%
Physics and Astronomy 1 <1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 14 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2020.
All research outputs
#10,840,649
of 18,890,258 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#74,625
of 82,764 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,499
of 126,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#813
of 951 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,890,258 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,764 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 93.1. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 951 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.