↓ Skip to main content

Geostatistical modeling of the gas emission zone and its in-place gas content for Pittsburgh-seam mines using sequential Gaussian simulation

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Coal Geology, February 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Geostatistical modeling of the gas emission zone and its in-place gas content for Pittsburgh-seam mines using sequential Gaussian simulation
Published in
International Journal of Coal Geology, February 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.coal.2011.10.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Özgen Karacan, Ricardo A. Olea, Gerrit Goodman

Abstract

Determination of the size of the gas emission zone, the locations of gas sources within, and especially the amount of gas retained in those zones is one of the most important steps for designing a successful methane control strategy and an efficient ventilation system in longwall coal mining. The formation of the gas emission zone and the potential amount of gas-in-place (GIP) that might be available for migration into a mine are factors of local geology and rock properties that usually show spatial variability in continuity and may also show geometric anisotropy. Geostatistical methods are used here for modeling and prediction of gas amounts and for assessing their associated uncertainty in gas emission zones of longwall mines for methane control. This study used core data obtained from 276 vertical exploration boreholes drilled from the surface to the bottom of the Pittsburgh coal seam in a mining district in the Northern Appalachian basin. After identifying important coal and non-coal layers for the gas emission zone, univariate statistical and semivariogram analyses were conducted for data from different formations to define the distribution and continuity of various attributes. Sequential simulations performed stochastic assessment of these attributes, such as gas content, strata thickness, and strata displacement. These analyses were followed by calculations of gas-in-place and their uncertainties in the Pittsburgh seam caved zone and fractured zone of longwall mines in this mining district. Grid blanking was used to isolate the volume over the actual panels from the entire modeled district and to calculate gas amounts that were directly related to the emissions in longwall mines. Results indicated that gas-in-place in the Pittsburgh seam, in the caved zone and in the fractured zone, as well as displacements in major rock units, showed spatial correlations that could be modeled and estimated using geostatistical methods. This study showed that GIP volumes may change up to 3 MMscf per acre and, in a multi-panel district, may total 9 Bcf of methane within the gas emission zone. Therefore, ventilation and gas capture systems should be designed accordingly. In addition, rock displacements within the gas emission zone are spatially distributed. From an engineering and practical point of view, spatial distributions of GIP and distributions of rock displacements should be correlated with in-mine emissions and gob gas venthole productions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bulgaria 1 3%
Malaysia 1 3%
China 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 28 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Other 4 12%
Professor 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 42%
Engineering 8 24%
Unspecified 6 18%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Energy 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2011.
All research outputs
#7,668,909
of 12,272,194 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Coal Geology
#162
of 261 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,003
of 101,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Coal Geology
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,272,194 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 261 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them