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A meta-analysis of prosocial media on prosocial behavior, aggression, and empathic concern: A multidimensional approach.

Overview of attention for article published in Developmental Psychology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
A meta-analysis of prosocial media on prosocial behavior, aggression, and empathic concern: A multidimensional approach.
Published in
Developmental Psychology, February 2018
DOI 10.1037/dev0000412
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah M. Coyne, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, Hailey G. Holmgren, Emilie J. Davis, Kevin M. Collier, Madison K. Memmott-Elison, Alan J. Hawkins

Abstract

Studies examining the effects of exposure to prosocial media on positive outcomes are increasing in number and strength. However, existing meta-analyses use a broad definition of prosocial media that does not recognize the multidimensionality of prosocial behavior. The aim of the current study is to conduct a meta-analysis on the effects of exposure to prosocial media on prosocial behavior, aggression, and empathic concern while examining multiple moderators that the prosocial behavior literature suggests are important to our understanding of why individuals voluntarily help others (e.g., target, type, cost). Results from 72 studies involving 243 effect sizes revealed that exposure to prosocial media was related to higher levels of prosocial behavior and empathic concern and lower levels of aggressive behavior. Moderation analyses suggest that several moderators accounted for heterogeneity in the model, including age of participant, region, media type (active vs. passive), and study design. In terms of multidimensional moderators, prosocial media had stronger effects on prosocial behavior toward strangers than did any other target and on helping and prosocial thinking but not donating or volunteering. Comparisons with other meta-analyses on media effects are made and implications for parents, media producers, and researchers are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Unspecified 8 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 53%
Unspecified 9 24%
Social Sciences 7 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,755,583
of 12,996,278 outputs
Outputs from Developmental Psychology
#393
of 3,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,919
of 271,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Developmental Psychology
#4
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,996,278 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.