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Longitudinal Examination of the Influence of Individual Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Clusters of Symptoms on the Initiation of Cigarette Smoking

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Addiction Medicine, January 2018
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Title
Longitudinal Examination of the Influence of Individual Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Clusters of Symptoms on the Initiation of Cigarette Smoking
Published in
Journal of Addiction Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1097/adm.0000000000000421
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amber D. Seelig, Kara M. Bensley, Emily C. Williams, Richard F. Armenta, Anna C. Rivera, Arthur V. Peterson, Isabel G. Jacobson, Alyson J. Littman, Charles Maynard, Jonathan B. Bricker, Rudolph P. Rull, Edward J. Boyko

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether specific individual posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or symptom clusters predict cigarette smoking initiation. Longitudinal data from the Millennium Cohort Study were used to estimate the relative risk for smoking initiation associated with PTSD symptoms among 2 groups: (1) all individuals who initially indicated they were nonsmokers (n = 44,968, main sample) and (2) a subset of the main sample who screened positive for PTSD (n = 1622). Participants were military service members who completed triennial comprehensive surveys that included assessments of smoking and PTSD symptoms. Complementary log-log models were fit to estimate the relative risk for subsequent smoking initiation associated with each of the 17 symptoms that comprise the PTSD Checklist and 5 symptom clusters. Models were adjusted for demographics, military factors, comorbid conditions, and other PTSD symptoms or clusters. In the main sample, no individual symptoms or clusters predicted smoking initiation. However, in the subset with PTSD, the symptoms "feeling irritable or having angry outbursts" (relative risk [RR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.76) and "feeling as though your future will somehow be cut short" (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.40) were associated with increased risk for subsequent smoking initiation. Certain PTSD symptoms were associated with higher risk for smoking initiation among current and former service members with PTSD. These results may help identify individuals who might benefit from more intensive smoking prevention efforts included with PTSD treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Researcher 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 50%
Social Sciences 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2018.
All research outputs
#7,357,294
of 12,826,501 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Addiction Medicine
#641
of 844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,273
of 272,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Addiction Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,826,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them