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Effects of wind-energy facilities on breeding grassland bird distributions

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
51 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
171 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of wind-energy facilities on breeding grassland bird distributions
Published in
Conservation Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12569
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jill A. Shaffer, Deborah A. Buhl

Abstract

The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003-2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2-5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 165 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 47 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 16%
Student > Master 24 14%
Other 20 12%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Other 17 10%
Unknown 20 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 43%
Environmental Science 53 31%
Engineering 3 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 1%
Unspecified 2 1%
Other 8 5%
Unknown 29 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2021.
All research outputs
#612,840
of 21,750,593 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#373
of 3,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,130
of 249,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#3
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,750,593 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,639 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,213 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.