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Expression analysis of human adipose-derived stem cells during in vitro differentiation to an adipocyte lineage

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, July 2015
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Title
Expression analysis of human adipose-derived stem cells during in vitro differentiation to an adipocyte lineage
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12920-015-0119-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Latha Satish, J. Michael Krill-Burger, Phillip H. Gallo, Shelley Des Etages, Fang Liu, Brian J. Philips, Sudheer Ravuri, Kacey G. Marra, William A. LaFramboise, Sandeep Kathju, J. Peter Rubin

Abstract

Adipose tissue-derived stromal stem cells (ASCs) represent a promising regenerative resource for soft tissue reconstruction. Although autologous grafting of whole fat has long been practiced, a major clinical limitation of this technique is inconsistent long-term graft retention. To understand the changes in cell function during the transition of ASCs into fully mature fat cells, we compared the transcriptome profiles of cultured undifferentiated human primary ASCs under conditions leading to acquisition of a mature adipocyte phenotype. Microarray analysis was performed on total RNA extracted from separate ACS isolates of six human adult females before and after 7 days (7 days: early stage) and 21 days (21 days: late stage) of adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Differential gene expression profiles were determined using Partek Genomics Suite Version 6.4 for analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on time in culture. We also performed unsupervised hierarchical clustering to test for gene expression patterns among the three cell populations. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to determine biologically significant networks and canonical pathways relevant to adipogenesis. Cells at each stage showed remarkable intra-group consistency of expression profiles while abundant differences were detected across stages and groups. More than 14,000 transcripts were significantly altered during differentiation while ~6000 transcripts were affected between 7 days and 21 days cultures. Setting a cutoff of +/-two-fold change, 1350 transcripts were elevated while 2929 genes were significantly decreased by 7 days. Comparison of early and late stage cultures revealed increased expression of 1107 transcripts while 606 genes showed significantly reduced expression. In addition to confirming differential expression of known markers of adipogenesis (e.g., FABP4, ADIPOQ, PLIN4), multiple genes and signaling pathways not previously known to be involved in regulating adipogenesis were identified (e.g. POSTN, PPP1R1A, FGF11) as potential novel mediators of adipogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR validated the microarray results. ASC maturation into an adipocyte phenotype proceeds from a gene expression program that involves thousands of genes. This is the first study to compare mRNA expression profiles during early and late stage adipogenesis using cultured human primary ASCs from multiple patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 35 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 13%
Engineering 2 5%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,866,371
of 5,398,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#223
of 358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,585
of 189,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#21
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,398,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 358 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.