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Population regulation in Gyrodactylus salaris – Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) interactions: testing the paradigm

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
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2 tweeters

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Title
Population regulation in Gyrodactylus salaris – Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) interactions: testing the paradigm
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0981-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raúl Ramírez, Tor A. Bakke, Philip D. Harris

Abstract

Gyrodactylus salaris is a directly transmitted ectoparasite that reproduces in situ on its fish host. Wild Norwegian (East Atlantic) salmon stocks are thought to be especially susceptible to the parasite due to lack of co-adaptation, contrary to Baltic salmon stocks. This study i) identifies whether time- and density-dependent mechanisms in gyrodactylid population growth exist in G. salaris-Atlantic salmon interactions and ii) based on differences between Norwegian and Baltic stocks, determines whether the 'Atlantic susceptible, Baltic resistant' paradigm holds as an example of local adaptation. A total of 18 datasets of G. salaris population growth on individually isolated Atlantic salmon (12 different stocks) infected with three parasite strains were re-analysed using a Bayesian approach. Datasets included over 2000 observations of 388 individual fish. The best fitting model of population growth was time-limited; parasite population growth rate declined consistently from the beginning of infection. We found no evidence of exponential population growth in any dataset. In some stocks, a density dependence in the size of the initial inoculum limited the maximum rate of parasite population growth. There is no evidence to support the hypothesis that all Norwegian and Scottish Atlantic salmon stocks are equally susceptible to G. salaris, while Baltic stocks control and limit infections due to co-evolution. Northern and Western Norwegian as well as the Scottish Shin stocks, support higher initial parasite population growth rates than Baltic, South-eastern Norwegian, or the Scottish Conon stocks, and several Norwegian stocks tested (Akerselva, Altaelva, Lierelva, Numedalslågen), and the Scottish stocks (i.e. Conon, Shin), were able to limit infections after 40-50 days. No significant differences in performance of the three parasite strains (Batnfjordselva, Figga, and Lierelva), or the two parasite mitochondrial haplotypes (A and F) were observed. Our study shows a spectrum of growth rates, with some fish of the South-eastern Norwegian stocks sustaining parasite population growth rates overlapping those seen on Baltic Neva and Indalsälv stocks. This observation is inconsistent with the 'Baltic-resistant, Atlantic-susceptible' hypothesis, but suggests heterogeneity, perhaps linked to other host resistance genes driven by selection for local disease syndromes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 43%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 38%
Mathematics 3 14%
Environmental Science 2 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,679,143
of 5,398,474 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#770
of 1,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,180
of 189,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#47
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,398,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,687 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.