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Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline

Overview of attention for article published in Geophysical Research Letters, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline
Published in
Geophysical Research Letters, September 2015
DOI 10.1002/2015gl065013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frans‐Jan W. Parmentier, Wenxin Zhang, Yanjiao Mi, Xudong Zhu, Jacobus Huissteden, Daniel J. Hayes, Qianlai Zhuang, Torben R. Christensen, A. David McGuire

Abstract

The Arctic is rapidly transitioning toward a seasonal sea ice-free state, perhaps one of the most apparent examples of climate change in the world. This dramatic change has numerous consequences, including a large increase in air temperatures, which in turn may affect terrestrial methane emissions. Nonetheless, terrestrial and marine environments are seldom jointly analyzed. By comparing satellite observations of Arctic sea ice concentrations to methane emissions simulated by three process-based biogeochemical models, this study shows that rising wetland methane emissions are associated with sea ice retreat. Our analyses indicate that simulated high-latitude emissions for 2005-2010 were, on average, 1.7 Tg CH4 yr(-1) higher compared to 1981-1990 due to a sea ice-induced, autumn-focused, warming. Since these results suggest a continued rise in methane emissions with future sea ice decline, observation programs need to include measurements during the autumn to further investigate the impact of this spatial connection on terrestrial methane emissions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
United States 2 4%
Unknown 45 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 35%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 12%
Engineering 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 131. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2016.
All research outputs
#228,567
of 20,957,071 outputs
Outputs from Geophysical Research Letters
#580
of 18,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,916
of 247,783 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Geophysical Research Letters
#7
of 322 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,957,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,560 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,783 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 322 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.