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Growth in syntactic complexity between four years and adulthood: evidence from a narrative task

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Child Language, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 440)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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24 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Growth in syntactic complexity between four years and adulthood: evidence from a narrative task
Published in
Journal of Child Language, June 2018
DOI 10.1017/s0305000918000144
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline FRIZELLE, Paul A. THOMPSON, David MCDONALD, Dorothy V. M. BISHOP

Abstract

Studies examining productive syntax have used varying elicitation methods and have tended to focus on either young children or adolescents/adults, so we lack an account of syntactic development throughout middle childhood. We describe here the results of an analysis of clause complexity in narratives produced by 354 speakers aged from four years to adulthood using the Expressive, Receptive, and Recall of Narrative Instrument (ERRNI). We show that the number of clauses per utterance increased steadily through this age range. However, the distribution of clause types depended on which of two stories was narrated, even though both stories were designed to have a similar story structure. In addition, clausal complexity was remarkably similar regardless of whether the speaker described a narrative from pictures, or whether the same narrative was recalled from memory. Finally, our findings with the youngest children showed that the task of generating a narrative from pictures may underestimate syntactic competence in those aged below five years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 11 23%
Unknown 14 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Linguistics 17 35%
Psychology 8 17%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,720,611
of 17,814,645 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Child Language
#42
of 440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,130
of 288,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Child Language
#2
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,814,645 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.