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Susceptibility of wild and colonized Anopheles stephensi to Plasmodium vivax infection

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Susceptibility of wild and colonized Anopheles stephensi to Plasmodium vivax infection
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2343-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ajeet Kumar Mohanty, Praveen Balabaskaran Nina, Shuvankar Ballav, Smita Vernekar, Sushma Parkar, Maria D’souza, Wenyun Zuo, Edwin Gomes, Laura Chery, Shripad Tuljapurkar, Neena Valecha, Pradipsinh K. Rathod, Ashwani Kumar

Abstract

As much as 80% of global Plasmodium vivax infections occur in South Asia and there is a shortage of direct studies on infectivity of P. vivax in Anopheles stephensi, the most common urban mosquito carrying human malaria. In this quest, the possible effects of laboratory colonization of mosquitoes on infectivity and development of P. vivax is of interest given that colonized mosquitoes can be genetically less divergent than the field population from which they originated. Patient-derived P. vivax infected blood was fed to age-matched wild and colonized An. stephensi. Such a comparison requires coordinated availability of same-age wild and colonized mosquito populations. Here, P. vivax infection are studied in colonized An. stephensi in their 66th-86th generation and fresh field-caught An. stephensi. Wild mosquitoes were caught as larvae and pupae and allowed to develop into adult mosquitoes in the insectary. Parasite development to oocyst and sporozoite stages were assessed on days 7/8 and 12/13, respectively. While there were batch to batch variations in infectivity of individual patient-derived P. vivax samples, both wild and colonized An. stephensi were roughly equally susceptible to oocyst stage Plasmodium infection. At the level of sporozoite development, significantly more mosquitoes with sporozoite load of 4+ were seen in wild than in colonized populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 33%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2018.
All research outputs
#6,850,448
of 13,044,081 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,062
of 3,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,252
of 271,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,081 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,821 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,114 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them