↓ Skip to main content

Pneumonia mortality and healthcare utilization in young children in rural Bangladesh: a prospective verbal autopsy study

Overview of attention for article published in Tropical Medicine & Health, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 145)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pneumonia mortality and healthcare utilization in young children in rural Bangladesh: a prospective verbal autopsy study
Published in
Tropical Medicine & Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41182-018-0099-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farzana Ferdous, Shahnawaz Ahmed, Sumon Kumar Das, Mohammod Jobayer Chisti, Dilruba Nasrin, Karen L. Kotloff, Myron M. Levine, James P. Nataro, Enbo Ma, Khitam Muhsen, Yukiko Wagatsuma, Tahmeed Ahmed, Abu Syed Golam Faruque

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the risk factors for death due to pneumonia in young children and healthcare behaviors of the guardians for children in rural Bangladesh. A prospective autopsy study was conducted among guardians of children aged 4 weeks to 59 months in Mirzapur, Bangladesh, from 2008 to 2012. Pneumonia was the primary cause of death, accounting for 26.4% (n = 81) of all 307 deaths. Of the pneumonia deaths, 58% (n = 47) deaths occurred in younger infants (aged 4 weeks to < 6 months) and 24.7% (n = 20) in older infants (aged 6-11 months). The median duration of illness before pneumonia death was 8 days (interquartile range [IQR] 3-20 days). Prior to death, 91.4% (n = 74) children with pneumonia sought treatment, and of those who sought treatment, 52.7% (n = 39) sought treatment ≥ 2 days after the onset of disease. Younger infants of 4 weeks to < 6 months old were at 5.5-time (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5, 12.0) and older infants aged 6-11 months were at 3-time (1.2, 7.5) greater risk of dying from pneumonia than older children aged 12-59 months. Children with a prolonged duration of illness (2-10 days) prior to death were at more risk for death by pneumonia than those who died from other causes (5.8 [2.1, 16.1]). Children who died from pneumonia sought treatment 3.4-time more than children who died from other causes. Delayed treatment seeking (≥ 2 days) behavior was 4.9-time more common in children who died from pneumonia than those who died from other causes. Children who died from pneumonia more often had access to care from multiple sources (5.7-time) than children who died from other causes. Delay in seeking appropriate care and access to multiple sources for treatment are the underlying risk factors for pneumonia death in young children in Bangladesh. These results indicate the perplexity in guardians' decisions to secure appropriate treatment for children with pneumonia. Therefore, it further underscores the importance of focusing on mass media coverage that can outline the benefits of seeking care early in the progression of pneumonia and the potential negative consequences of seeking care late.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 21%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 6 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 38%
Unspecified 6 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2018.
All research outputs
#6,866,585
of 13,092,437 outputs
Outputs from Tropical Medicine & Health
#49
of 145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,066
of 270,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tropical Medicine & Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,092,437 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 145 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them