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Infant activity and sleep behaviors in a maternal and infant home visiting project among rural, southern, African American women

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, May 2018
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Title
Infant activity and sleep behaviors in a maternal and infant home visiting project among rural, southern, African American women
Published in
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40748-018-0078-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica L. Thomson, Lisa M. Tussing-Humphreys, Melissa H. Goodman, Alicia S. Landry

Abstract

Physical inactivity and inadequate amounts of sleep are two potential causes for excessive weight gain in infancy. Thus, parents and caregivers of infants need to be educated about decreasing infant sedentary behavior, increasing infant unrestrained floor time, as well as age specific recommended amounts of sleep for infants. The aims of this study were to determine if maternal knowledge about infant activity and sleep changed over time and to evaluate maternal compliance rates with expert recommendations for infant sleep in a two-arm, randomized, controlled, comparative impact trial. Pregnant women at least 18 years of age, less than 19 weeks pregnant, and residing in a lower Mississippi Delta county were recruited between March 2013 and December 2014. Postnatal data was collected from 54 participants between September 2013 and May 2016. McNemar's test of symmetry was used to determine if maternal knowledge changed over time, while generalized linear mixed models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to assess compliance with expert recommendations for infant sleep. The postnatal retention rate was 85%. Maternal knowledge significantly increased for correct infant sleep position (back) and beginning tummy time by one month of age. Odds of meeting sleep duration recommendations increased by 30% for every one month increase in infant age. Only 20% of the participants were compliant with the back to sleep recommendation for the first 12 months of their infant's life; median time to noncompliance was 7.8 months. Although baseline knowledge concerning infant activity and sleep was high in this cohort of rural, Southern, African American mothers, compliance with recommendations was not optimal. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01746394) on December 5, 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 7 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,403,229
of 13,046,126 outputs
Outputs from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#44
of 55 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,854
of 270,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,046,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,777 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them