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Family-based treatment for transition age youth: parental self-efficacy and caregiver accommodation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Eating Disorders, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Family-based treatment for transition age youth: parental self-efficacy and caregiver accommodation
Published in
Journal of Eating Disorders, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40337-018-0196-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gina Dimitropoulos, Ashley L. Landers, Victoria E. Freeman, Jason Novick, Olivia Cullen, Marla Engelberg, Cathleen Steinegger, Daniel Le Grange

Abstract

Family-Based Treatment (FBT) is the first line of care in paediatric treatment while adult programs focus on individualized models of care. Transition age youth (TAY) with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) are in a unique life stage and between systems of care. As such, they and their caregivers may benefit from specialized, developmentally tailored models of treatment. The primary purpose of this study was to assess if parental self-efficacy and caregiver accommodation changed in caregivers during the course of FBT-TAY for AN. The secondary aim was to determine if changes in parental self-efficacy and caregiver accommodation contributed to improvements in eating disorder behaviour and weight restoration in the transition age youth with AN. Twenty-six participants (ages 16-22) and 39 caregivers were recruited. Caregivers completed the Parents versus Anorexia Scale and Accommodation and Enabling Scale for Eating Disorders at baseline, end-of-treatment (EOT), and 3 months follow-up. Unbalanced repeated measures designs for parental self-efficacy and caregiver accommodation towards illness behaviours were conducted using generalized estimation equations. Parental self-efficacy increased from baseline to EOT, although not significantly (p = .398). Parental self-efficacy significantly increased from baseline to 3 months post-treatment (p = .002). Caregiver accommodation towards the illness significantly decreased from baseline to EOT (p = 0.0001), but not from baseline to 3 months post-treatment (p = 1.000). Stepwise ordinary least squares regression estimates of eating disorder behaviour and weight restoration did not show that changes in parental-self efficacy and caregiver accommodation predict eating disorder behaviour or weight restoration at EOT or 3 months post-treatment. Our findings demonstrate, albeit preliminary at this stage, that FBT-TAY promotes positive increases in parental self-efficacy and assists caregivers in decreasing their accommodation to illness behaviours for transition age youth with AN. However, changes in the parental factors did not influence changes in eating and weight in the transition age youth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 15%
Student > Master 3 15%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Other 5 25%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 30%
Neuroscience 3 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,225,514
of 13,725,722 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Eating Disorders
#107
of 342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,554
of 270,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Eating Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,725,722 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,870 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them