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Prevalence and Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Coinfection among HIV-Positive Women in South Africa and Botswana

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, July 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence and Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Coinfection among HIV-Positive Women in South Africa and Botswana
Published in
PLoS ONE, July 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0134037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippa C. Matthews, Apostolos Beloukas, Amna Malik, Jonathan M. Carlson, Pieter Jooste, Anthony Ogwu, Roger Shapiro, Lynn Riddell, Fabian Chen, Graz Luzzi, Manjeetha Jaggernath, Gerald Jesuthasan, Katie Jeffery, Thumbi Ndung’u, Philip J. R. Goulder, Anna Maria Geretti, Paul Klenerman

Abstract

There is progressive concern about the evolving burden of morbidity and mortality caused by coinfection with HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus (HBV) in sub-Saharan Africa, but the epidemiology and impact of this problem are not well defined. We therefore set out to assimilate more information about the nature of HBV/HIV coinfection in this region by undertaking a retrospective observational study of southern African adult women. We used samples from previously recruited HIV-1 positive women attending antenatal clinics in three settings in South Africa and Botswana (n = 950) and added a small cohort of HIV-negative antenatal South African women for comparison (n = 72). We tested for HBsAg and followed up HBsAg-positive samples by testing for HBeAg, HBV DNA, HBV genotype, presence of drug-resistance associated mutations (RAMs) and HDV. We identified HBsAg in 72 individuals (7% of the whole cohort), of whom 27% were HBeAg-positive, and the majority HBV genotypes A1 and A2. We did not detect any HDV coinfection. HBV prevalence was significantly different between geographically distinct cohorts, but did not differ according to HIV status. Among adults from South Africa, HBV/HIV coinfected patients had lower CD4+ T cell counts compared to those with HIV-monoinfection (p = 0.02), but this finding was not replicated in the cohort from Botswana. Overall, these data provide a snapshot of the coinfection problem at the heart of the HIV/HBV co-epidemic, and are important to inform public health policy, resource allocation, education, surveillance and clinical care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 92 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 20%
Student > Master 19 20%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Other 26 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 33%
Unspecified 15 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 11%
Other 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,992,240
of 12,289,018 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#30,191
of 134,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,017
of 240,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,263
of 6,053 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,289,018 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 134,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,053 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.