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Water and sanitation: an essential battlefront in the war on antimicrobial resistance

Overview of attention for article published in FEMS Microbiology Ecology, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 1,289)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
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Title
Water and sanitation: an essential battlefront in the war on antimicrobial resistance
Published in
FEMS Microbiology Ecology, June 2018
DOI 10.1093/femsec/fiy101
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helmut Bürgmann, Dominic Frigon, William H Gaze, Célia M Manaia, Amy Pruden, Andrew C Singer, Barth F Smets, Tong Zhang

Abstract

Water and sanitation represents a key battlefront in combating the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Basic water sanitation infrastructure is an essential first step to protecting public health, thereby limiting the spread of pathogens and the need for antibiotics. AMR presents unique human health risks, meriting new risk assessment frameworks specifically adapted to water and sanitation-borne AMR. There are numerous exposure routes to AMR originating from human waste, each of which must be quantified for its relative risk to human health. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) play a vital role in centralized collection and treatment of human sewage, but there are numerous unresolved questions in terms of the microbial ecological processes occurring within and the extent to which they attenuate or amplify AMR. Research is needed to advance understanding of the fate of resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in various waste management systems, depending on the local constraints and intended re-use applications. WHO and national AMR action plans would benefit from a more holistic 'One Water' understanding. Here we provide a framework for research, policy, practice, and public engagement aimed at limiting the spread of AMR from water and sanitation in both low-, medium- and high-income countries, alike.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 26%
Unspecified 17 18%
Student > Master 17 18%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 16 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 31 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 17%
Environmental Science 10 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Engineering 7 8%
Other 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2019.
All research outputs
#580,663
of 13,278,410 outputs
Outputs from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#23
of 1,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,973
of 269,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#3
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,278,410 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,289 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,697 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.