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Transient coastal landscapes: Rising sea level threatens salt marshes

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, November 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
Title
Transient coastal landscapes: Rising sea level threatens salt marshes
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, November 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.235
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivan Valiela, Javier Lloret, Tynan Bowyer, Simon Miner, David Remsen, Elizabeth Elmstrom, Charlotte Cogswell, E. Robert Thieler

Abstract

Salt marshes are important coastal environments that provide key ecological services. As sea level rise has accelerated globally, concerns about the ability of salt marshes to survive submergence are increasing. Previous estimates of likely survival of salt marshes were based on ratios of sea level rise to marsh platform accretion. Here we took advantage of an unusual, long-term (1979-2015), spatially detailed comparison of changes in a representative New England salt marsh to provide an empirical estimate of habitat losses based on actual measurements. We show prominent changes in habitat mosaic within the marsh, consistent and coincident with increased submergence and coastal erosion. Model results suggest that at current rates of sea level rise, marsh platform accretion, habitat loss, and with the limitation of the widespread "coastal squeeze", the entire ecosystem might disappear by the beginning of the next century, a fate that might be likely for many salt marshes elsewhere. Meta-analysis of available data suggests that 40 to 95% of the world's salt marshes will be submerged, depending on whether sea level rise remains at current or reaches anticipated rates for the end of this century.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 17%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 26 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 14%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Design 2 2%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,537,628
of 15,099,310 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#1,291
of 13,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,838
of 278,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#51
of 522 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,099,310 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,371 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 522 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.