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PTEN signaling is required for the maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells in mouse, by regulating the expressions of PLZF and UTF1.

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, January 2015
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Title
PTEN signaling is required for the maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells in mouse, by regulating the expressions of PLZF and UTF1.
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13578-015-0034-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhou, Wei, Shao, Hongfang, Zhang, Di, Dong, Jian, Cheng, Wei, Wang, Lu, Teng, Yincheng, Yu, Zhuo

Abstract

Pten plays a crucial role in the stem cell maintenance in a few organs. Pten defect also causes the premature oocytes and ovary aging. We and other groups have found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling regulates the proliferation and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). PTEN functions as a negative regulator of the PI3K pathway. Thus, we thought that the fate of SSCs might be controlled by Pten. We report that promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger (PLZF) and undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1), both of which are germ cell-specific transcriptional factors, are regulated by Pten. Conditional deletion of Pten leads to reduction in PLZF expression but induction of UTF1, which is associated with SSCs depletion and infertility in males with age. Our data demonstrate that Pten is required for the long-term maintenance of SSCs and precise regulation of spermatogenesis in mouse. The finding of a Pten-regulated GFRα1(+)/PLZF(-)/UTF1(+) progenitor population provides a new insight into the precise mechanisms controlling SSC fate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 18%
Computer Science 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2015.
All research outputs
#3,815,601
of 5,422,157 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#104
of 157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,269
of 189,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,422,157 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 157 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.