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Alteração no comportamento alimentar de trabalhadores de turnos de um frigorífico do sul do Brasil

Overview of attention for article published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, August 2015
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Title
Alteração no comportamento alimentar de trabalhadores de turnos de um frigorífico do sul do Brasil
Published in
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, August 2015
DOI 10.1590/1413-81232015208.18642014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisângela da Silva de Freitas, Raquel Canuto, Ruth Liane Henn, Beatriz Anselmo Olinto, Jamile Block Araldi Macagnan, Marcos Pascoal Pattussi, Fernanda Michelin Busnello, Maria Teresa Anselmo Olinto

Abstract

The relationship between shift work and the eatinghabits of workers was investigated in a slaughterhouse in southern Brazil. It involved a cross-sectional study with 1,206 workers of both sexes between 18 and 50 years of age. A standardized questionnaire was used to gather demographic, socioeconomic, work shift and eating habit information. The shift of work was categorized into daytime and nighttime, based on the starting and ending times of the shift. The eating habits of workers were evaluated as follows: number and type of meals eaten during the 24 hours of a normal day, the inappropriateness of the hoursof these meals and the dietaryrisk score. This was built on the risk score of the weekly consumption of 13 food items. After adjusting for potential confounders, non-Caucasian and younger male workers were more likely to manifest eating risk habits. Nighttimeshift workers consumed ahigher number of meals/day with greater inappropriateness of meal times than daytimeshift workers. The night shift can negatively influence the eating habits of workers of that shift.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 17 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 19 39%