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Vascular injuries of the extremities are a major challenge in a third world country

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, July 2015
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Vascular injuries of the extremities are a major challenge in a third world country
Published in
Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13032-015-0027-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fahad H. Khan, Kamal M. Yousuf, Anel R. Bagwani

Abstract

Traumatic vascular injuries of the extremities are a major challenge especially in the third world countries. These injuries are mostly due to poor traffic laws, street crimes, firearms and blast associated injuries. We therefore would like to share our 10 years of experience in dealing with vascular injuries in Pakistan. This was a retrospective observational study conducted in the department of vascular surgery of Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Patients' records were retrieved from the department and were reviewed. Cases with vascular injuries of upper and lower limb that presented with signs of salvageable limb and presented within 12 hours of injury were included in the study. Patients with more than 12 hours of presentation and in whom primary amputation was done, were excluded from the study. There were 328 patients who presented with vascular injuries of the extremities that fell in the inclusion criteria. Limb salvage rate was 41 %, whereas 30-days perioperative mortality was 5.48 %. The major cause of limb loss was delay in presentation of more than 8 h of injury. Major vessels involved were popliteal artery (41.76 %), followed by femoral artery (27.43 %). Vascular injuries are becoming a major contributor of limb loss in third world countries due to violence, terrorism and unavailability of vascular facilities. This morbidity can be reduced by improving law and order situation, evolving an effective emergency ambulatory system and with better training and provision of vascular services in remote areas so that the delay factor can be reduced.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 67%
Engineering 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,879,995
of 5,422,321 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#22
of 46 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,558
of 189,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,422,321 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one scored the same or higher as 24 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,586 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.