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Global prevalence and distribution of coinfection of malaria, dengue and chikungunya: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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178 Mendeley
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Title
Global prevalence and distribution of coinfection of malaria, dengue and chikungunya: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5626-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nasir Salam, Shoeb Mustafa, Abdul Hafiz, Anis Ahmad Chaudhary, Farah Deeba, Shama Parveen

Abstract

Malaria, Dengue and Chikungunya are vector borne diseases with shared endemic profiles and symptoms. Coinfections with any of these diseases could have fatal outcomes if left undiagnosed. Understanding the prevalence and distribution of coinfections is necessary to improve diagnosis and designing therapeutic interventions. We have carried out a systematic search of the published literature based on PRISMA guidelines to identify cases of Malaria, Dengue and Chikungunya coinfections. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify eligible studies and extracted data regarding cases of coinfection from cross sectional studies, case reports, retrospective studies, prospective observational studies and surveillance reports. Care full screening resulted in 104 publications that met the eligibility criteria and reported Malaria/Dengue, Dengue/Chikungunya, Malaria/Chikungunya and Malaria/Dengue/Chikungunya coinfections. These coinfections were spread over six geographical locations and 42 different countries and are reported more frequently in the last 15 years possibly due to expanding epidemiology of Dengue and Chikungunya. Few of these reports have also analysed distinguishing features of coinfections. Malaria/Dengue coinfections were the most common coinfection followed by Dengue/Chikungunya, Malaria/Chikungunya and Malaria/Dengue/Chikungunya coinfections. P. falciparum and P. vivax were the commonest species found in cases of malaria coinfections and Dengue serotype-4 commonest serotype in cases of dengue coinfections. Most studies were reported from India. Nigeria and India were the only two countries from where all possible combinations of coinfections were reported. We have comprehensively reviewed the literature associated with cases of coinfections of three important vector borne diseases to present a clear picture of their prevalence and distribution across the globe. The frequency of coinfections presented in the study suggests proper diagnosis, surveillance and management of cases of coinfection to avoid poor prognosis of the underlying etiology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 178 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 22%
Researcher 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Postgraduate 15 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 8%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 42 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 6%
Other 31 17%
Unknown 55 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2021.
All research outputs
#2,362,498
of 21,427,634 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,694
of 13,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,377
of 298,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,427,634 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,909 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them