↓ Skip to main content

Prospective Randomized Study of the Effect of Music on the Efficiency of Surgical Closures

Overview of attention for article published in Aesthetic Surgery Journal, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,060)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
429 tweeters
facebook
17 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Prospective Randomized Study of the Effect of Music on the Efficiency of Surgical Closures
Published in
Aesthetic Surgery Journal, July 2015
DOI 10.1093/asj/sju161
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shelby R. Lies, Andrew Y. Zhang

Abstract

Music is commonly played in operating theaters. Some surgeons believe music reduces stress and operative time, while others think music is a distraction and should be avoided. There is limited published evidence evaluating the effects of music on surgical performance. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of music on simple wound closure. Plastic surgery residents were asked to perform layered closures on pigs' feet with and without their preferred music playing. Simple randomization was used to assign residents to the music playing first or music playing second group. The time to complete the repair was measured and repairs were graded by blinded faculty. Results were analyzed to determine significant differences in time to complete the task and quality of repair. Participants were retested in a second session with music played in the opposite order to evaluate consistency. Listening to preferred music decreased repair time by 8% for all plastic surgery residents (p = 0.009). Subgroup analysis demonstrated even more significant improvement in speed for senior residents (PGY 4-6), resulting in a 10% decrease in repair time (p = 0.006). The quality of repair was also better in the music group, at 3.3 versus 3.1 (p = 0.047). Retesting revealed results remained significant whether music was played first or second. Playing preferred music made plastic surgery residents faster in completing wound closure with a 10% improvement in senior residents. Music also improved quality of repair as judged by blinded faculty. Our study showed that music improves efficiency of wound closure, which may translate to healthcare cost savings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 429 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 21%
Researcher 8 19%
Unspecified 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Other 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 49%
Unspecified 7 16%
Arts and Humanities 3 7%
Psychology 3 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Other 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 502. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2019.
All research outputs
#15,411
of 13,133,421 outputs
Outputs from Aesthetic Surgery Journal
#6
of 1,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#310
of 233,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aesthetic Surgery Journal
#1
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,133,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,060 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.