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Perioperative corticosteroid administration: a systematic review and descriptive analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Perioperative Medicine, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Perioperative corticosteroid administration: a systematic review and descriptive analysis
Published in
Perioperative Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13741-018-0092-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Groleau, S. N. Morin, L. Vautour, A. Amar-Zifkin, A. Bessissow

Abstract

Perioperative administration of corticosteroid is common and variable. Guidelines for perioperative corticosteroid administration before non-cardiac non-transplant surgery in patients with current or previous corticosteroid use to reduce the risk of adrenal insufficiency are lacking. Perioperative use of corticosteroid may be associated with serious adverse events, namely hyperglycemia, infection, and poor wound healing. To determine whether perioperative administration of corticosteroids, compared to placebo or no intervention, reduces the incidence of adrenal insufficiency in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery who were or are exposed to corticosteroids. We searched MEDLINE via Ovid and PubMed, EMBASE via Ovid, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, all from 1995 to January 2017. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, case-studies, and systematic reviews involving adults undergoing non-cardiac non-transplant surgery and reporting the incidence of postoperative adrenal insufficiency. Two authors independently assessed studies' quality and extracted data. A descriptive and bias assessment analysis was performed. Two RCTs (total of 37 patients), five cohort studies (total of 462 patients), and four systematic reviews were included. Neither RCT showed a significant difference in the outcome. This result was like that of the five cohort studies. The quality of the evidence was low. The current use of perioperative corticosteroid supplementation to prevent adrenal insufficiency is not supported by evidence. Given the significant studies' limitations, it is not possible to conclude that perioperative administration of corticosteroids, compared to placebo, reduces the incidence of adrenal insufficiency.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Other 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 59%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 11%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2019.
All research outputs
#4,371,326
of 14,375,216 outputs
Outputs from Perioperative Medicine
#56
of 134 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,594
of 276,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Perioperative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,375,216 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 134 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them