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The microbiome of otitis media with effusion in Indigenous Australian children

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
The microbiome of otitis media with effusion in Indigenous Australian children
Published in
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, September 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.ijporl.2015.07.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jake Jervis-Bardy, Geraint B. Rogers, Peter S. Morris, Heidi C. Smith-Vaughan, Elizabeth Nosworthy, Lex E.X. Leong, Renee J. Smith, Laura S. Weyrich, Jacques De Haan, A. Simon Carney, Amanda J. Leach, Stephen O’Leary, Robyn L. Marsh

Abstract

Indigenous Australian children have a high prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) and associated conductive hearing loss. Only three microbiological studies of middle ear fluid (MEF) from Indigenous Australian children with OME have been reported. All of these were reliant on culture or species-specific PCR assays. The aim of this study was to characterise the middle ear fluid (MEF), adenoid and nasopharyngeal (NP) microbiomes of Indigenous Australian children, using culture-independent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MEF, NP swabs and adenoid specimens were collected from 11 children in the Alice Springs region of Central Australia. Bacterial communities in these specimens were characterised using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The microbiota in MEF samples were dominated (>50% relative abundance) by operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consistent with Alloiococcus otitidis (6/11), Haemophilus influenzae (3/11) or Streptococcus sp. (specifically, Mitis group streptococci which includes Streptococcus pneumoniae) (1/11). Anatomical site selectivity was indicated by the presence of a single conserved Haemophilus OTU in 7/11 MEF samples. In comparison, there were ten distinct Haemophilus OTUs observed across the NP and adenoid samples. Despite significant differences between the MEF and NP/adenoid microbiomes, Streptococcus sp., H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis OTUs were common to all sample types. Co-occurrence of classical otopathogens in paired MEF and NP/Adenoid samples is consistent with earlier culture-based studies. These data highlight the need to further assess H. influenzae traits important in otitis media and to understand the role of canal flora, especially A. otitidis, in populations with a high prevalence of tympanic membrane perforation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 6 13%
Researcher 6 13%
Other 5 10%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 48%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,794,689
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
#314
of 3,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,908
of 244,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
#10
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.