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Magnetospherically driven optical and radio aurorae at the end of the stellar main sequence

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
51 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Magnetospherically driven optical and radio aurorae at the end of the stellar main sequence
Published in
Nature, July 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14619
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. Hallinan, S. P. Littlefair, G. Cotter, S. Bourke, L. K. Harding, J. S. Pineda, R. P. Butler, A. Golden, G. Basri, J. G. Doyle, M. M. Kao, S. V. Berdyugina, A. Kuznetsov, M. P. Rupen, A. Antonova

Abstract

Aurorae are detected from all the magnetized planets in our Solar System, including Earth. They are powered by magnetospheric current systems that lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons into the high-latitude regions of the upper atmosphere. In the case of the gas-giant planets, these aurorae include highly polarized radio emission at kilohertz and megahertz frequencies produced by the precipitating electrons, as well as continuum and line emission in the infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray parts of the spectrum, associated with the collisional excitation and heating of the hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report simultaneous radio and optical spectroscopic observations of an object at the end of the stellar main sequence, located right at the boundary between stars and brown dwarfs, from which we have detected radio and optical auroral emissions both powered by magnetospheric currents. Whereas the magnetic activity of stars like our Sun is powered by processes that occur in their lower atmospheres, these aurorae are powered by processes originating much further out in the magnetosphere of the dwarf star that couple energy into the lower atmosphere. The dissipated power is at least four orders of magnitude larger than what is produced in the Jovian magnetosphere, revealing aurorae to be a potentially ubiquitous signature of large-scale magnetospheres that can scale to luminosities far greater than those observed in our Solar System. These magnetospheric current systems may also play a part in powering some of the weather phenomena reported on brown dwarfs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 8 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 26 72%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Materials Science 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 525. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2017.
All research outputs
#15,688
of 13,927,844 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#2,122
of 70,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#290
of 234,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#77
of 915 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,927,844 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,845 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 78.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,971 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 915 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.