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The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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145 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, December 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.066
Pubmed ID
Authors

Teresa J. Mackintosh, Jenny A. Davis, Ross M. Thompson

Abstract

The construction of wetlands in urban environments is primarily carried out to assist in the removal of contaminants from wastewaters; however, these wetlands have the added benefit of providing habitat for aquatic invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. Stormwater quantity and quality is directly related to impervious area (roads, sealed areas, roofs) in the catchment. As a consequence, it would be expected that impervious area would be related to contaminant load and biodiversity in receiving waters such as urban wetlands. This study aimed to establish whether the degree of urbanisation and its associated changes to stormwater runoff affected macroinvertebrate richness and abundance within constructed wetlands. Urban wetlands in Melbourne's west and south east were sampled along a gradient of urbanisation. There was a significant negative relationship between total imperviousness (TI) and the abundance of aquatic invertebrates detected for sites in the west, but not in the south east. However macroinvertebrate communities were relatively homogenous both within and between all study wetlands. Chironomidae (non-biting midges) was the most abundant family recorded at the majority of sites. Chironomids are able to tolerate a wide array of environmental conditions, including eutrophic and anoxic conditions. Their prevalence suggests that water quality is impaired in these systems, regardless of degree of urbanisation, although the causal mechanism is unclear. These results show some dependency between receiving wetland condition and the degree of urbanisation of the catchment, but suggest that other factors may be as important in determining the value of urban wetlands as habitat for wildlife.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 139 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 22%
Student > Bachelor 28 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 17%
Researcher 19 13%
Professor 9 6%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 55 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 23%
Engineering 15 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 4%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 25 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2016.
All research outputs
#2,066,433
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#1,944
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,193
of 236,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#13
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,749 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.