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The impact of video speed on the decision-making process of sports officials

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 155)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
52 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of video speed on the decision-making process of sports officials
Published in
Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41235-018-0105-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jochim Spitz, Pieter Moors, Johan Wagemans, Werner F. Helsen

Abstract

There is an increasing trend in association football (soccer) to assist referees in their decision-making with video technology. For decisions such as whether a goal has been scored or which player actually committed a foul, video technology can provide more objective information and be valuable to increase decisional accuracy. It is unclear, however, to what extent video replays can aid referee decisions in the case of foul-play situations in which the decision is typically more ambiguous. In this study, we specifically evaluated the impact of slow-motion replays on decision-making by referees. To this end, elite referees of five different countries (n = 88) evaluated 60 different foul-play situations taken from international matches, replayed in either real time or slow motion. Our results revealed that referees penalized situations more severely in slow motion compared to real time (e.g. red card with a yellow card reference decision). Our results provide initial evidence that video replay speed can have an important impact on the disciplinary decision given by the referee in case of foul play. The study also provides a real-life test-case for theories and insights regarding causality perception.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 35%
Student > Master 5 14%
Lecturer 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Psychology 4 11%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 448. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#26,195
of 15,348,605 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#5
of 155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,105
of 278,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,348,605 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them