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Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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2 patents

Citations

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60 Dimensions

Readers on

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102 Mendeley
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Title
Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response
Published in
PLoS ONE, June 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0067224
Pubmed ID
Authors

Devon W. Kavanaugh, John O’Callaghan, Ludovica F. Buttó, Helen Slattery, Jonathan Lane, Marguerite Clyne, Marian Kane, Lokesh Joshi, Rita M. Hickey

Abstract

In this study, we tested the hypothesis that milk oligosaccharides may contribute not only to selective growth of bifidobacteria, but also to their specific adhesive ability. Human milk oligosaccharides (3'sialyllactose and 6'sialyllactose) and a commercial prebiotic (Beneo Orafti P95; oligofructose) were assayed for their ability to promote adhesion of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Treatment with the commercial prebiotic or 3'sialyllactose did not enhance adhesion. However, treatment with 6'sialyllactose resulted in increased adhesion (4.7 fold), while treatment with a mixture of 3'- and 6'-sialyllactose substantially increased adhesion (9.8 fold) to HT-29 intestinal cells. Microarray analyses were subsequently employed to investigate the transcriptional response of B. longum subsp. infantis to the different oligosaccharide treatments. This data correlated strongly with the observed changes in adhesion to HT-29 cells. The combination of 3'- and 6'-sialyllactose resulted in the greatest response at the genetic level (both in diversity and magnitude) followed by 6'sialyllactose, and 3'sialyllactose alone. The microarray data was further validated by means of real-time PCR. The current findings suggest that the increased adherence phenotype of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis resulting from exposure to milk oligosaccharides is multi-faceted, involving transcription factors, chaperone proteins, adhesion-related proteins, and a glycoside hydrolase. This study gives additional insight into the role of milk oligosaccharides within the human intestine and the molecular mechanisms underpinning host-microbe interactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 102 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Master 13 13%
Professor 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 13 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 41%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 11%
Chemistry 7 7%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 20 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2019.
All research outputs
#2,435,423
of 15,496,449 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#33,248
of 155,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,791
of 236,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,187
of 6,049 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,496,449 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 155,209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,049 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.