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Ambulance staff and end-of-life hospital admissions: A qualitative interview study

Overview of attention for article published in Palliative Medicine, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 1,751)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
152 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
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Title
Ambulance staff and end-of-life hospital admissions: A qualitative interview study
Published in
Palliative Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1177/0269216318779238
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Hoare, Michael P Kelly, Larissa Prothero, Stephen Barclay

Abstract

Hospital admissions for end-of-life patients, particularly those who die shortly after being admitted, are recognised to be an international policy problem. How patients come to be transferred to hospital for care, and the central role of decisions made by ambulance staff in facilitating transfer, are under-explored. To understand the role of ambulance staff in the admission to hospital of patients close to the end of life. Qualitative interviews, using particular patient cases as a basis for discussion, analysed thematically. Ambulance staff ( n = 6) and other healthcare staff (total staff n = 30), involved in the transfer of patients (the case-patients) aged more than 65 years to a large English hospital who died within 3 days of admission with either cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or dementia. Ambulance interviewees were broadly positive about enabling people to die at home, provided they could be sure that they would not benefit from treatment available in hospital. Barriers for non-conveyance included difficulties arranging care particularly out-of-hours, limited available patient information and service emphasis on emergency care. Ambulance interviewees fulfilled an important role in the admission of end-of-life patients to hospital, frequently having to decide whether to leave a patient at home or to instigate transfer to hospital. Their difficulty in facilitating non-hospital care at the end of life challenges the negative view of near end-of-life hospital admissions as failures. Hospital provision was sought for dying patients in need of care which was inaccessible in the community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 152 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 26%
Student > Master 11 16%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 111. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2019.
All research outputs
#227,682
of 17,930,534 outputs
Outputs from Palliative Medicine
#39
of 1,751 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,980
of 288,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Palliative Medicine
#4
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,930,534 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,751 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.