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Self‐help educational booklets for the prevention of smoking relapse following smoking cessation treatment: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Self‐help educational booklets for the prevention of smoking relapse following smoking cessation treatment: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Addiction, September 2015
DOI 10.1111/add.13080
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vivienne Maskrey, Annie Blyth, Tracey J. Brown, Garry R. Barton, Caitlin Notley, Paul Aveyard, Richard Holland, Max O. Bachmann, Stephen Sutton, Jo. Leonardi‐Bee, Thomas H. Brandon, Fujian Song

Abstract

Most people who quit smoking for a short term will return to smoking again in 12 months. We tested whether self-help booklets can reduce relapse in short-term quitters after receiving behavioural and pharmacological cessation treatment. A parallel arm, pragmatic individually randomised controlled trial. Smoking cessation clinics in England. People who stopped smoking for four weeks after receiving cessation treatment in stop smoking clinics. Participants in the experimental group (n = 703) were mailed eight booklets, each of which taught readers how to resist urges to smoke. Participants in the control group (n = 704) received a leaflet currently used in practice. The primary outcome was prolonged, carbon monoxide verified abstinence from month four to 12. The secondary outcomes included seven-day self-reported abstinence at three and 12 months. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate treatment effects and to investigate possible effect modifying variables. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in prolonged abstinence from month four to 12 (37% vs. 39%; odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.16; P = 0.524). In addition, there were no significant differences between the groups in any secondary outcomes. However, people who reported knowing risky situations for relapse and using strategies to handle urges to smoke were less likely to relapse. In people who successfully stop smoking with behavioural support, a comprehensive self-help educational programme to teach people skills to identify and respond to high risk situations for return to smoking did not reduce relapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 24%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 18%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2015.
All research outputs
#1,540,639
of 16,016,553 outputs
Outputs from Addiction
#1,243
of 4,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,559
of 237,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction
#21
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,016,553 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,993 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.