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Cultural adaptation of a brief motivational intervention for heavy drinking among Hispanics in a medical setting

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Cultural adaptation of a brief motivational intervention for heavy drinking among Hispanics in a medical setting
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1984-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Craig A. Field, José Alonso Cabriales, Robert H. Woolard, Alan H. Tyroch, Raul Caetano, Yessenia Castro

Abstract

Hispanics, particularly men of Mexican origin, are more likely to engage in heavy drinking and experience alcohol-related problems, but less likely to obtain treatment for alcohol problems than non-Hispanic men. Our previous research indicates that heavy-drinking Hispanics who received a brief motivational intervention (BMI) were significantly more likely than Hispanics receiving standard care to reduce subsequent alcohol use. Among Hispanics who drink heavily the BMI effectively reduced alcohol use but did not impact alcohol-related problems or treatment utilization. We hypothesized that an adapted BMI that integrates cultural values and addresses acculturative stress among Hispanics would be more effective. We describe here the protocol for the design and implementation of a randomized (approximately 300 patients per condition) controlled trial evaluating the comparative effectiveness of a culturally adapted (CA) BMI in contrast to a non-adapted BMI (NA-BMI) in a community hospital setting among men of Mexican origin. Study participants will include men who were hospitalized due to an alcohol related injury or screened positive for heavy drinking. By accounting for risk and protective factors of heavy drinking among Hispanics, we hypothesize that CA-BMI will significantly decrease alcohol use and alcohol problems, and increase help-seeking and treatment utilization. This is likely the first study to directly address alcohol related health disparities among non-treatment seeking men of Mexican origin by comparing the benefits of a CA-BMI to a NA-BMI. This study stands to not only inform interventions used in medical settings to reduce alcohol-related health disparities, but may also help reduce the public health burden of heavy alcohol use in the United States. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02429401 ; Registration date: April 28, 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 11 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,891,497
of 5,441,762 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,143
of 5,792 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,444
of 189,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#210
of 273 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,441,762 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,792 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,880 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 273 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.