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Consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality: population based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 35,595)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
86 news outlets
blogs
23 blogs
twitter
1340 tweeters
facebook
73 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
62 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality: population based cohort study
Published in
British Medical Journal, August 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmj.h3942
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun Lv, Lu Qi, Canqing Yu, Ling Yang, Yu Guo, Yiping Chen, Zheng Bian, Dianjianyi Sun, Jianwei Du, Pengfei Ge, Zhenzhu Tang, Wei Hou, Yanjie Li, Junshi Chen, Zhengming Chen, Liming Li, Lv, Jun, Qi, Lu, Yu, Canqing, Yang, Ling, Guo, Yu, Chen, Yiping, Bian, Zheng, Sun, Dianjianyi, Du, Jianwei, Ge, Pengfei, Tang, Zhenzhu, Hou, Wei, Li, Yanjie, Chen, Junshi, Chen, Zhengming, Li, Liming, ,

Abstract

To examine the associations between the regular consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality. Population based prospective cohort study. China Kadoorie Biobank in which participants from 10 geographically diverse areas across China were enrolled between 2004 and 2008. 199 293 men and 288 082 women aged 30 to 79 years at baseline after excluding participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline. Consumption frequency of spicy foods, self reported once at baseline. Total and cause specific mortality. During 3 500 004 person years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median 7.2 years), a total of 11 820 men and 8404 women died. Absolute mortality rates according to spicy food consumption categories were 6.1, 4.4, 4.3, and 5.8 deaths per 1000 person years for participants who ate spicy foods less than once a week, 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Spicy food consumption showed highly consistent inverse associations with total mortality among both men and women after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. In the whole cohort, compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, the adjusted hazard ratios for death were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.96), 0.86 (0.80 to 0.92), and 0.86 (0.82 to 0.90) for those who ate spicy food 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, those who consumed spicy foods 6 or 7 days a week showed a 14% relative risk reduction in total mortality. The inverse association between spicy food consumption and total mortality was stronger in those who did not consume alcohol than those who did (P=0.033 for interaction). Inverse associations were also observed for deaths due to cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. In this large prospective study, the habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with total and certain cause specific mortality, independent of other risk factors of death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,340 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 3 3%
Germany 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 100 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 16 14%
Other 15 13%
Student > Master 14 12%
Other 33 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 58 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 19 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1815. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#459
of 8,668,084 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#19
of 35,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11
of 231,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#1
of 910 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,668,084 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 35,595 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,333 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 910 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.