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Acquisition and dissemination of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli in migratory birds sampled at an Alaska landfill as inferred through genomic analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
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Title
Acquisition and dissemination of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli in migratory birds sampled at an Alaska landfill as inferred through genomic analysis
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-25474-w
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina A. Ahlstrom, Jonas Bonnedahl, Hanna Woksepp, Jorge Hernandez, Björn Olsen, Andrew M. Ramey

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens threatens global health, though the spread of AMR bacteria and AMR genes between humans, animals, and the environment is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of AMR Escherichia coli. Using next-generation sequencing, we characterized cephalosporin-resistant E. coli cultured from sympatric gulls and bald eagles inhabiting a landfill habitat in Alaska to identify genetic determinants conferring AMR, explore potential transmission pathways of AMR bacteria and genes at this site, and investigate how their genetic diversity compares to isolates reported in other taxa. We found genetically diverse E. coli isolates with sequence types previously associated with human infections and resistance genes of clinical importance, including blaCTX-M and blaCMY. Identical resistance profiles were observed in genetically unrelated E. coli isolates from both gulls and bald eagles. Conversely, isolates with indistinguishable core-genomes were found to have different resistance profiles. Our findings support complex epidemiological interactions including bacterial strain sharing between gulls and bald eagles and horizontal gene transfer among E. coli harboured by birds. Results suggest that landfills may serve as a source for AMR acquisition and/or maintenance, including bacterial sequence types and AMR genes relevant to human health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Master 10 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 8%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 20 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 30 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2019.
All research outputs
#8,242,927
of 16,021,503 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#33,900
of 84,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,953
of 280,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,021,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,006 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,897 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them