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Genetic diversity of Italian goat breeds assessed with a medium-density SNP chip

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics Selection Evolution, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 403)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic diversity of Italian goat breeds assessed with a medium-density SNP chip
Published in
Genetics Selection Evolution, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12711-015-0140-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Letizia Nicoloso, Lorenzo Bomba, Licia Colli, Riccardo Negrini, Marco Milanesi, Raffaele Mazza, Tiziana Sechi, Stefano Frattini, Andrea Talenti, Beatrice Coizet, Stefania Chessa, Donata Marletta, Mariasilvia D’Andrea, Salvatore Bordonaro, Grazyna Ptak, Antonello Carta, Giulio Pagnacco, Alessio Valentini, Fabio Pilla, Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Paola Crepaldi

Abstract

Among the European countries, Italy counts the largest number of local goat breeds. Thanks to the recent availability of a medium-density SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) chip for goat, the genetic diversity of Italian goat populations was characterized by genotyping samples from 14 Italian goat breeds that originate from different geographical areas with more than 50 000 SNPs evenly distributed on the genome. Analysis of the genotyping data revealed high levels of genetic polymorphism and an underlying North-south geographic pattern of genetic diversity that was highlighted by both the first dimension of the multi-dimensional scaling plot and the Neighbour network reconstruction. We observed a moderate and weak population structure in Northern and Central-Southern breeds, respectively, with pairwise FST values between breeds ranging from 0.013 to 0.164 and 7.49 % of the total variance assigned to the between-breed level. Only 2.11 % of the variance explained the clustering of breeds into geographical groups (Northern, Central and Southern Italy and Islands). Our results indicate that the present-day genetic diversity of Italian goat populations was shaped by the combined effects of drift, presence or lack of gene flow and, to some extent, by the consequences of traditional management systems and recent demographic history. Our findings may constitute the starting point for the development of marker-assisted approaches, to better address future breeding and management policies in a species that is particularly relevant for the medium- and long-term sustainability of marginal regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 23%
Researcher 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 69%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Physics and Astronomy 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2017.
All research outputs
#847,002
of 11,638,001 outputs
Outputs from Genetics Selection Evolution
#11
of 403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,675
of 235,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics Selection Evolution
#2
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,638,001 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 403 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.