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Enabling participation for disabled young people: study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Enabling participation for disabled young people: study protocol
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5652-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Penelope Carroll, Karen Witten, Octavia Calder-Dawe, Melody Smith, Robin Kearns, Lanuola Asiasiga, Judy Lin, Nicola Kayes, Suzanne Mavoa

Abstract

Participation in community life is vital for health and wellbeing, promoting a sense of belonging, networks of social support and opportunities for physical activity. Disabled young people have lower levels of mobility and participation in recreational activities (physical, social and cultural), education and employment, than their peers without disabilities. This has implications for their health and wellbeing and life course opportunities. Previous research on the participation levels of disabled young people has primarily relied on parent/caregiver reports and been oriented to home and school environments. This study investigates how physical and social environmental factors cohere to support or restrict the everyday mobility and participation of disabled young people. The study is located in Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ). Participants comprise 35 young people aged 12-25 years with mobility, vision or hearing impairments. A mixed-methods research design combines objective (global positioning systems, accelerometers, geographical information systems) and self-report measures (travel diaries, and questionnaires) to assess young people's mobility and levels of participation in leisure/educational and employment activities with in-depth interviews exploring their everyday experiences of inclusion/exclusion, and factors enabling or constraining community participation. Parents/caregivers and disability sector key informant viewpoints on the community participation of disabled young people have also been gathered through in-depth interviews. Follow-up workshops with young people and parents/caregivers will identify pathways to increase participation and challenge current disabling practices. This study looks beyond barriers in the physical environment to the interplay of personal, social and physical factors that enable or constrain the community participation of disabled young people. In keeping with the study's overarching goal of increasing opportunities for effective community participation and full citizenship of disabled young people, research methods were applied flexibily - negotiated and adapted to maximise each young person's participation in light of their abilities and preferences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 8 27%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Psychology 3 10%
Sports and Recreations 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2019.
All research outputs
#536,210
of 13,704,051 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#521
of 9,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,617
of 270,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,704,051 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them