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Elevated body swing test after focal cerebral ischemia in rodents: methodological considerations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, August 2015
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Title
Elevated body swing test after focal cerebral ischemia in rodents: methodological considerations
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0189-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edvin Ingberg, Johanna Gudjonsdottir, Elvar Theodorsson, Annette Theodorsson, Jakob O Ström

Abstract

The elevated body swing test (EBST) is a behavioral test used to evaluate experimental stroke in rodents. The basic idea is that when the animal is suspended vertically by the tail, it will swing its head laterally to the left or right depending on lesion side. In a previous study from our lab using the EBST after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), rats swung contralateral to the infarct day 1 post-MCAo, but ipsilateral day 3 post-MCAo. This shift was unexpected and prompted us to perform the present study. First, the literature was systematically reviewed to elucidate whether a similar shift had been noticed before, and if consensus existed regarding swing direction. Secondly, an experiment was conducted to systematically investigate the suggested behavior. Eighty-three adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to MCAo or sham surgery and the EBST was performed up to 7 days after the lesion. Both experimentally and through systematic literature review, the present study shows that the direction of biased swing activity in the EBST for rodents after cerebral ischemia can differ and even shift over time in some situations. The EBST curve for females was significantly different from that of males after the same occlusion time (p = 0.023). This study highlights the importance of adequate reporting of behavioral tests for lateralization and it is concluded that the EBST cannot be recommended as a test for motor asymmetry after MCAo in rats.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 32%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 26%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Unspecified 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 16%
Neuroscience 2 11%
Unspecified 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2015.
All research outputs
#10,132,990
of 11,428,083 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#797
of 946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,002
of 235,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#20
of 22 outputs
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