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Insular biogeographic origins and high phylogenetic distinctiveness for a recently depleted lizard fauna from Christmas Island, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
37 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Insular biogeographic origins and high phylogenetic distinctiveness for a recently depleted lizard fauna from Christmas Island, Australia
Published in
Biology Letters, June 2018
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0696
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul M. Oliver, Mozes P. K. Blom, Harold G. Cogger, Robert N. Fisher, Jonathan Q. Richmond, John C. Z. Woinarski

Abstract

Striking faunal turnover across Asia and Australasia, most famously along the eastern edge of the Sunda Shelf or 'Wallace's Line', has been a focus of biogeographic research for over 150 years. Here, we investigate the origins of a highly threatened endemic lizard fauna (four species) on Christmas Island. Despite occurring less 350 km south of the Sunda Shelf, this fauna mostly comprises species from clades centred on the more distant regions of Wallacea, the Pacific and Australia (more than 1000 km east). The three most divergent lineages show Miocene (approx. 23-5 Ma) divergences from sampled relatives; and have recently become extinct or extinct in the wild, likely owing to the recent introduction of a southeast Asian snake (Lycodon capucinus). Insular distributions, deep phylogenetic divergence and recent decline suggest that rather than dispersal ability or recent origins, environmental and biotic barriers have impeded these lineages from diversifying on the continental Sunda Shelf, and thereby, reinforced faunal differentiation across Wallace's Line. Our new phylogenetically informed perspective further highlights the rapid loss of ancient lineages that has occurred on Christmas Island, and underlines how the evolutionary divergence and vulnerability of many island-associated lineages may continue to be underestimated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 38%
Unspecified 4 25%
Environmental Science 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2019.
All research outputs
#702,004
of 13,466,037 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#835
of 2,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,540
of 269,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#22
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,466,037 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,493 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.